Wednesday, January 7, 2015

How To Start An Herb Container Garden




How To Start An Herb Container Garden
A tasty addition to just about any meal, herbs are extremely easy to grow at home. In fact, if you have no backyard, be excited because herbs are ideally suited to container gardening. Since you can keep your container in the kitchen, you'll find it easy to use them more often, and they'll be a beautiful addition to your d├ęcor. Because some herbs, such as mint, will take over a regular garden, the container garden provides an added benefit by keeping runaway plants under control. There are just a few easy steps to follow to have a lovely and useful garden of your own.
First off, you'll need to choose a container. The only limits here are your imagination and food safety. Your only limitation when it comes to choosing pots for herbs is that you need to use containers that are food safe. Make sure you're not using pottery glazed with lead based chemicals. Plastic or glass pots as well as unfinished terra cotta will be safe. Almost all herbs will thrive in small pots or you can put several together in a window box, an old wheelbarrow, or anything that can hold the soil.
Choosing your herbs is really a question of taste. You may love the taste of rosemary and hate the taste of oregano. Perhaps to you parsley is just plate decoration while marjoram is divine. Choose which herbs you'd like to use and then plan accordingly. Pay particular attention to which herbs like more sun or less water and be sure to put like plants together when you craft your herb container garden.
Many of the herbs you will want to grow can be purchased as plants right from the start. Some herbs, however, will mature quickly and easily from seeds, so plan on putting together a mix of plants and seeds as you start on your container herb garden. Grassy green herbs like chives, mint, and parsley really perform best from seed because they're very difficult to transplant and they grow very quickly. The bushy, woody herbs like oregano and rosemary are much better to start as plants. You can also get a number of the softer herbs like basil and mint as plants. The wonderful thing about those is that you'll be able to enjoy them in your cooking almost immediately.
If you keep your container herb garden indoors, you may be able to keep the garden going year-round, but even indoors you may need to replace a few plants. Still, fresh herbs in a stew in the dead of winter are a surprising and wonderful delight, and experimenting with which herbs you can keep indefinitely is well worth the effort.
Once you're underway, you'll find your container herb garden a rewarding and creative use of time. Beautiful and useful, the garden can change your kitchen into the envy of your friends and they joy of your family.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6036482

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